Low FODMAP breakfast ideas

Worried about a restricted breakfast while following the FODMAP diet? Don’t be! The good news is there are plenty of breakfast options still on the menu…

First up, low FODMAP breakfast cereals

Kellogg’s cornflakes, Rice Krispies, Frosted flakes and more are all low FODMAP (in appropriate portion sizes)

Before we continue please be aware, Kellogg’s products do not appear to be gluten free – some are definitely not gluten free – they should therefore be avoided by those with coeliac disease or those who have a considerable intolerance to gluten. (From research I have done.) Scroll down for gluten free cereal possible low FODMAP options.

-Cornflakes are a classic breakfast cereal and the good news is Kellogg’s Cornflakes have been certified as low FODMAP in servings of up to 42 grams according to the monash app.

-If you prefer your breakfast to ‘snap crackle and pop,’ however, you’re in luck as Kellogg’s Rice Krispies have also been certified as low FODMAP in servings of up to 40 grams according to the monash app.

-Meanwhile, those with a sweet tooth will be be pleased to hear Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes have been certified as low FODMAP in servings of up to 37 grams according to the monash app.

Kellogg’s Special K original is also certified as low FODMAP in servings of up to 39 grams according the the monash app.


‘Own brand’ low FODMAP cereal options

Supermarkets often sell their own versions of popular cereals such as cornflakes and rice pops. But this is where it gets confusing, according to the monash FODMAP app, although up to 42 grams of Kellogg’s cornflakes are low FODMAP, it says ‘flakes of corn’ are low FODMAP in up to only 15 grams. Therefore it’s probably best to play it safe and keep servings to 15 grams maximum when it comes to own brand cereals that would appear to be low FODMAP.

Disclaimer – I am reluctant to say anything is ‘low FODMAP’ with certainty that isn’t certified, therefore I can only go by my own careful research based opinion – so be aware, the following information is opinion and research based, it is not certified and is not a known fact.

When it comes to own brand cereals, it’s really important to check for ‘sneaky’ high FODMAP additional ingredients.

While you may think ‘normal’ cornflakes or Rice Krispies are gluten free, it’s a bit more complicated than that. Cereals may be made in factories that also deal with gluten containing products meaning cross contamination may be an issue. In addition to this, gluten covers a wide range of grains – not just wheat – which may be added to cereals that to perhaps enhance there flavour.

Once again, I am reluctant to say anything is ‘low FODMAP’ with certainty that isn’t certified, therefore I can only go by my own careful research based opinion – so be warned, the following information is opinion and research based, it is not certified and is not a known fact.


Low FODMAP Gluten free cornflakes

I believe there are low FODMAP gluten free cornflake options out there. However, as I have previously mentioned just above, this is where it gets a little confusing, while the monash app says up to 42 grams of Kellogg’s cornflakes are low FODMAP, it says ‘flakes of corn’ meanwhile are low FODMAP in up to only 15 grams. Therefore, it’s probably best to play it safe and if it’s not Kellogg’s, have 15 grams of corn flakes only.

‘Whole earth golden organic cornflakes’ are gluten free and appear to be very natural ingredient wise, consisting of mainly organic corn (94%) along with just 3 other ingredients – none of which appear to be high FODMAP. I am not an expert, but in my opinion I can’t see why these wouldn’t be low FODMAP in servings of just 15 grams.

Similarly, ‘Nestle Go Free gluten free cornflakes’ are gluten free and don’t appear to contain any additional high FODMAP ingredients. They also contain added vitamins and minerals. Once again, this particular cereal is not certified as low FODMAP, but based on the monash app saying flakes of corn in servings of up to 15 grams are low FODMAP, I can’t see why this would be a problem FODMAP wise in the appropriate serving size.

Low FODMAP gluten free ‘puffed rice’

When it comes to ‘puffed Rice’ commonly known as Rice Krispies, rice pops or rice snaps etc, as with cornflakes, monash says 15 grams is ‘low FODMAP’. So what are low FODMAP gluten free options for these?

Sainsbury’s and Morrison’s both currently stock gluten free rice pops. Morrison’s free from rice pops 300 grams’ and ‘Sainsbury’s deliciously free from rice pops 300 grams’. And on reading the ingredients, they would appear to be low FODMAP in 15 gram servings. They don’t appear to contain any additional high FODMAP ingredients.

Low FODMAP porridge

Please be aware the following products may or may not be gluten free.

A low FODMAP diet does not mean porridge is off the menu. In fact, porridge is a great low FODMAP breakfast choice!

Low FODMAP milk options

‘Normal’ milk is only low FODMAP in very very small amounts, but there are other options such as lactose free milk, almond milk or rice milk which offer a low FODMAP alternative in generous servings.

MILK: When it comes to adding milk to porridge or cereals, ‘normal’ milk is high in FODMAPs unless in very very small amounts, so alternative options could include:

-lactose free milk (low FODMAP in up to 257 gram serves)

-rice milk (low FODMAP in up to 200 gram serves)

-almond milk (low FODMAP in up to 240 gram serves).

-Macademia milk (low FODMAP in up to 240 gram serves)

-quinoa milk (unsweetened) (low FODMAP in up up 240 gram serves)

-lactose free Yogurt as an alternative to milk – You could even mix your cereal with lactose free yogurt if you’d like to! (Up to 170 grams is low FODMAP.)

*While oats don’t naturally contain gluten, they can become contaminated with it during processing – this is something to be aware of if you have coeliac disease or a considerable gluten intolerance.

Porridge is made with oats, so here’s a low down on the serving sizes classified as low FODMAP

For a more detailed description of oats and FODMAP’s Please click here to see ‘A Little bit of Yummy’ s very informative post on this.

To simplify…

Rolled oats: A low FODMAP serve of rolled oats is up to 50 grams.

-oat flakes: A low FODMAP serve of oat flakes is up to 50 grams.

-Quick oats: For quick oats, a low FODMAP serving is 23 grams.

-Oat groats (whole oat kernels that are hulled): When it comes to oat groats, a low FODMAP serving is 60 grams.

You can make your own porridge – ‘FODMAP friendly’ has a great post about this – Click here to find out more

But if you’d rather buy your porridge ‘ready’, keep reading…

Low FODMAP porridge’s / oats available

-Quaker Oat So simple original porridge – Quaker Oat so simple original porridge is available from many supermarkets and is made with 100% rolled oats, it comes in sachets each 27 grams and based on rolled oats being low FODMAP at 50 grams according the monash app, it should therefore be low FODMAP at its 27 gram serving size.

-Quaker rolled oats – Quaker Oats are ‘100% Quaker rolled oats’ and the Monash app says up to 50 grams of rolled oats is low FODMAP, therefore, Quaker Oats rolled should be low FODMAP in this serving size.

Lots of Quaker products are certified by monash as low FODMAP, so it’s worth checking out there app for more information on this such as the appropriate serving size, if you’re a porridge fan.

Scott’s Porage original Scottish Porridge rolled oats – By the same logic as above, with Quaker rolled oats, as Scott’s porage original rolled oats ingredients are ‘100% Scott’s Rolled Oats, without anythin’ added’, they should be low FODMAP in up to 50 gram serves.

Important: Please note if you’re coeliac or have a considerable gluten intolerance Quaker Oats and Scott’s Porage original oats are not suitable for you.


Supermarket own brand oats

Lots of supermarkets do their own brand porridge oats worth considering. Just make sure to check the type of oat (flakes, rolled, I stand etc) and refer to the monash app for suggested low FODMAP serving size.

It’s important to note where supermarket own brand oats are concerned, just as with ‘branded oats’, it’s really important to beware of cross contamination when it comes to supermarket own brand oats if you’re coeliac or have a considerable gluten intolerance. Gluten free oats are available in many supermarkets, but according to coeliac UK, although most people with coeliac disease can eat gluten free oats, a small number are still sensitive to gluten free oats. If you do buy gluten free oats, remember to refer to the type of oat – rolled, quick oats, oat groats – and the low FODMAP serving size.


Low FODMAP porridge or cereal toppings

If you like your porridge to have a bit of flavour, whether that be mixed in or as a topping, the good news is there are a variety of low FODMAP options to give it a ‘kick!’

These include…

  • raspberries – up to 30 raspberries are low FODMAP
  • Strawberries – up to 10 medium sized strawberries are low FODMAP
  • Banana – (‘common’) unripe up to 100 gram serving or ripe up to 56 gram serving is low FODMAP.
  • dark chocolate 85% – up to 20 grams is low FODMAP
  • Flax seeds / linseeds – up to 15 grams are low FODMAP
  • Peanut butter – up to 50 grams is low FODMAP
  • Chia seeds – Up to 24 grams of chia seeds are low FODMAP
  • Nuts – hazelnuts (up to 15 grams is low FODMAP) Walnuts (up to 30 grams is low FODMAP) Brazil nuts (up to 40 grams of Brazil nuts is low FODMAP)
  • Almonds – up to 12 grams of almonds is low FODMAP
  • Maple syrup – up to 50 grams is low FODMAP
  • Blueberries – up to 40 grams is low FODMAP

Low FODMAP breakfast biscuits / oatcakes

If you don’t have the time or energy to make porridge, you could try having oatcakes for breakfast instead!

The Monash app says that up to 4 (9 gram each) oatcakes (36 grams in total) is low FODMAP.

-Nairn’s gluten free oat cakes: Made with 90% whole grain oats, Nairn’s gluten free oatcakes provide a convenient breakfast choice. Although Nairn’s oatcakes are not officially certified by Monash as being low FODMAP, as monash say that 4 oatcakes are low FODMAP, and on looking at the ingredients in these – not to mention all the information on oats – I personally can’t see why these would not be low FODMAP.

Adding flavour and protein to your oatcakes: To fill you up, you could spread peanut butter (see above for serving size) on your oatcakes and top with sliced banana (see above for serving size.)

Eggs are low FODMAP

If you’re a fan of eggs for your breakfast, the good news is not just one but two eggs are low FODMAP – at 117 grams in total. Hello

Just because they’re low FODMAP though doesn’t mean that everyone gets on with them. But if you seem okay with them, there’s no reason to stop eating them as they’re low FODMAP.

An omelette is low FODMAP too

If eggs are low FODMAP, that means omelettes are low FODMAP too provided you stick to the serving size of 2 eggs (117 grams in total)!

If you make your omelette using milk, remember to use lactose free milk rather than ‘normal’ milk.

You could eat your omelette plain, but if you want to give it a ‘kick’, you could use additional low FODMAP ingredients. This could include…

  • Milk – see just above
  • A low FODMAP cheese such as – cheddar, Feta, havarti, mozzarella etc (all low FODMAP in up to 40 grams serves) Many other hard cheeses are low FODMAP as well.
  • Ham without high FODMAP additives – On research I have done, ham itself should be low FODMAP, however make sure to check for high FODMAP ingredients such as honey or high fructose syrup for example – even hams with honey in the title may still contain honey in the ingredients list (honey is only low FODMAP at up to 7 grams) so it’s important to be vigilant. Everyday FODMAP has a post all about ham and FODMAPs, for more information click here.
  • baby spinach or spinach – baby spinach and spinach (english) are both low FODMAP in up to 75 gram serves.
  • Seasonings – when it comes to seasonings, there is so much to choose from that is low FODMAP. Chives (low FODMAP in up to 4 grams serves) black pepper, paprika, cumin, rosemary etc are just a few low FODMAP seasonings options. Click here for Monash’s post all about low FODMAP seasoning.
  • Butter – up to 19 grams of butter is low FODMAP.

There are plenty of low FODMAP omelette recipes out there with additional tasty low FODMAP ingredients available to follow.

How do I know if my breakfast cereal / biscuit is low FODMAP?

Part of being on the low FODMAP diet is playing detective. It can be painstaking at times going through ingredient by ingredient and researching trying to find out if any ingredients are high FODMAP. But in my experience, if you’re unsure this is the best way to go about things. Many commercial products available aren’t certified as low FODMAP, so if I’m unsure, I’ll do exactly as above and literally check one ingredient after the other. If you’re still unsure, so long as we’re not talking allergies here and it’s without risk of serious consequence, you could always try a small amount of a product and if it sits well with you, that’s what counts.

Hopefully after reading this post, having a low FODMAP breakfast won’t feel so restrictive – there are lots of delicious filling and tasty low FODMAP options out there!

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